A Surprise Visit from a Cormorant

Image courtesy of Michael Elliott at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Cormorant–Image courtesy of Michael Elliott at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

We had a surprising and humorous encounter with a cormorant on a recent visit to the Bruce Peninsula in Ontario. Shortly after pulling out of a parking spot in the town of Lion’s Head, we heard a loud sound coming from the back of the car. We couldn’t figure out what this was and thought that perhaps something was rolling around in the trunk.  However, when the sound returned 2 or 3 more times, I turned around in the passenger seat to see if the trunk was unlatched. There, looking back at me from the rear of the car, was a cormorant.  We quickly pulled over to the side of the street and got out, hoping the bird wasn’t injured in some way. S/he seemed fine–no wings held at odd angles or other obvious problems that might explain why s/he had landed on the car. So this remains a mystery to us. After looking at us for a few seconds, the cormorant hopped onto the side of the road. A man heading the other way stopped to tell us he’d been amazed to see the bird land on our car. Thankfully, Lion’s Head is a small place where other vehicles had a chance to slow down or stop to make sure they didn’t hit the bird.


Be a Bee

Bee on Flower

Image courtesy of Tina Phillips / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Last weekend I went to the exhibition of students’ art work at OCAD, The Ontario College of Art and Design, in Toronto.  I was impressed by the number of students whose work addressed their concerns about the health of the natural world.

One fibre artist, Cassidy Tam, exhibited a large work she’d created along with her idea for a children’s camp called Camp Be a Bee.  I didn’t get a chance to meet Cassidy, but loved her art work and camp idea.

On her flyer, she writes:

Have you ever get scared by a furry Bumblebee? Do you know why they like to hang around in the backyard?  Get ready for a two-week adventure to explore and learn about pollination and local plants that live in Toronto. From art exploration to scientific experiment, you will interact with other camp members to build a beautiful meadow just like a hard working little bee!

I was drawn to her ideas because of my concern for the health of bees. I’m also heartened when I see people working to bridge the gap of disconnection between humans and the natural world.  Helping city children appreciate nature is an important part of changing our attitudes toward the larger world that sustains our lives.

Good luck, Cassidy, with your camp and your art work.  Here’s Cassidy’s website.  Her card, below, shows her email.

Camp-Be-a-Bee-Flyer

Camp Be a Bee Flyer by Cassidy Tam

 

Cassidy's Card

 


Fowl and Fido

I went to the Brickworks last Sunday. The air was awash with the calls of red-wing blackbirds and soaring and diving swallows.  I came upon mallards and cormorants in the ponds, plus a mournful and patient dog awaiting the return of his human companions.

Brickworks mallaard

A mallard at the Brickworks, Toronto, April 27, 2014

Brickworks Cormorant

Double-Crested Cormorant at the Evergreen Brickworks, Toronto, April 27, 2014

Fido

Woof. When are they coming back to me?!


Rabbit or Hare?

Last June, as I was walking through the wild flowers beside the railroad tracks to go to the Brickworks in Toronto, I came upon this rabbit or hare late in the afternoon.  If anyone can identify this animal, I’d be happy to know which creature it is.

Rabbit or hare

Rabbit or hare, early June 2013, Toronto.


Spring is Coming to Todmorden Mills

Buds on tree

On Sunday, I went again to Todmorden Mills in Toronto. It was sunny and relatively mild–around 8 or 9 Celsius. I walked on the little wildflower path through trees and by a pond and streams. On the way, I’d seen a cardinal atop a naked tree–pointed out to me by a young couple passing by. In the woods, I heard chickadees and a red winged blackbird. And a woman walking her dogs pointed out a woodpecker–I think it was a downy–on a nearby tree that she was photographing. I searched the ground for tiny green shoots, leaves and moss, looked in the trees and shrubs for buds and came upon a squirrel looking down at me while munching a nut.

Fern and moss

 

Woods at Todmorden Mills

I was thinking about the latest climate change report that came out several days earlier warning again about the changes to the climate that are already here and that will be coming. I thought about what we gain and lose when nature is protected or harmed. When I am in a natural setting, urban or more wild, I feel a link to something larger than myself. I am a living being among others in nature. I know my experience is not unique and that the companionship of humans and non is vitally important for my, and others, well-being.

Buds on trees


Hazzmats for Bees

You’ve likely heard that bees are dying in alarming numbers.  Much of this has been traced to Neonicitinoid pesticides. Here’s a satirical look at a very serious problem that affects not only the bees but all animals who eat. Put out yesterday by the Sierra Club of Canada: Finally! Some good news for the bees… | Sierra Club Canada

Bee Hazzmats

 


In Search of Open Water

It’s been a hard season for waterfowl.  The extreme cold has frozen most of the Great Lakes for the first time in around 20 years.  Around Toronto and north of here, there are reports of many swans and ducks being found dead because of the lack of open water that they can land on and find food in.

So on a warm day (10° C) last week when I took a long walk, I looked out over Riverdale Park off of Broadview Avenue onto melting snow.  I soon realized that the specks on a sizable flooded area were actually ducks. And I wondered if they have come here because they are having trouble finding open water on Lake Ontario. 

Ducks in melting snow

Ducks in melting snow and ice, Riverdale Park, Toronto, March 11/14